Library Podcast

Welcome to DLR Libraries Podcast page, a new service from DLR Libraries. If you missed some of our events over the past few months you can now get a chance to hear them as they happened thanks to our new podcasting page.

Here you can browse the complete collection of podcasts in the series. Each one may be played on the page, or downloaded and saved. You can also use iTunes for automatic downloading and syncing to an iPod, or subscribe to the RSS feed.

Our Podcast

Daniel Levitin
25 January 2017
Join Daniel Levitin, acclaimed neuroscientist and bestselling author of The Organized Mind as he explains and debunks statistics in his new book A Field Guide to Lies and Statistics. Levitin teaches us how to effectively ask ourselves: can we really know that? And how do they know that?
 
Recorded at dlr LexIcon Studio on Tuesday, 24 January 2017.
 
 
Dublin since 1922: A panoramic yet intimate history of Dublin since Independence, by Tim Carey
21 December 2016

Recorded on Tuesday 8 November in dlr LexIcon Studio

Dublin Since 1922 tells the story of Ireland's capital city since independence. Richly illustrated throughout, it unfolds around hundreds of dates in the city's history, beginning with the founding of the Irish state - when Dublin had the worst slums in Europe - and ending in the last days of the Celtic Tiger. Through major events, Carey charts nearly a century of the capital's history, from the Civil War, the Eucharistic Congress and President Kennedy's visit, to the 1986 earthquake, the Stardust disaster and the changing faces of the St Patrick's Day parade. Brought to life are the figures who have shaped the city's identity - from Archbishop McQuaid to Tony Gregory, from Luke Kelly to Maeve Binchy - and the daily life of its people, through the books they read, the way they move around the city, the music they listen to, the crimes they commit and the unique experiences they have of simply being in the city of Dublin. A captivating celebration of people and place, this book makes essential reading for anyone who wants to understand how the character of a city - and its inhabitants - is shaped.

Tim Carey, dlr’s Heritage Officer is author of Mountjoy, The Story of a Prison, Hanged for Ireland, Hanged for Murder and Croke Park: A History.

Listen back here: https://soundcloud.com/dlr-soundcloud/dublin-since-1922-tim-careymp3

Margaret Drabble in conversation with Niall MacMonagle
21 December 2016

Dame Margaret Drabble is the author of eighteen novels including A Summer Bird-Cage, The Millstone, The Peppered Moth, The Red Queen, and most recently, the highly acclaimed The Pure Gold Baby. She has also written biographies, screenplays and was the editor of the Oxford Companion to English Literature. Her glittering new novel, The Dark Flood Rises, holds our hand as we walk through the valley of the shadow of death. The question of what constitutes a good death and how we understand it if we have lived well preoccupy this dark and enthralling novel. With characteristic wit and caustic prose, The Dark Flood Rises dazzles, entertains and poses the big existential questions in equal measure.

Recorded at the Pavilion Theatre on Wednesday 23 November 2016

Listen back here: https://soundcloud.com/dlr-soundcloud/margaret-drabble-mp3

Robert Harris in conversation with Hugh Linehan
24 November 2016

Pavilion Theatre, Tue 4 Oct 2016.

Described as 'the UK’s supreme exponent of the literary thriller', Robert Harris is the author of ten bestselling novels: the Cicero Trilogy and historical and political thrillers such as Fatherland, Enigma, Archangel, Pompeii, The Ghost, and An Officer and A Spy.

His latest novel, set in Papal Rome, carries all the hallmarks of Harris’s exhilarating storytelling style. In Conclave, the Pope has died and behind the locked doors of the Sistine Chapel, one hundred and twenty Cardinals from all over the globe prepare to cast their votes in the world’s most secretive election. They are holy men. But they have ambition. And they have rivals. Over the next seventy-two hours one of them will become the most powerful spiritual figure on earth.

Listen back here: https://soundcloud.com/dlr-soundcloud/robert-harris

Margaret Atwood in conversation with Declan Hughes
24 November 2016

Margaret Atwood has consistently named Shakespeare as one of the most important influences on her work. ‘The Tempest is, in some ways, an early multi-media musical,’ she says. ‘If Shakespeare were working today he’d be using every special effect technology now makes available. But The Tempest is especially intriguing because of the many questions it leaves unanswered. What a strenuous pleasure it has been to wrestle with it!’

Published as part of the Hogarth Shakespeare’s modern interpretations series, Hag-Seed is Margaret Atwood’s novel take on Shakespeare’s play of enchantment, revenge and second chances.  Atwood leads us on an interactive, illusion-ridden journey filled with new surprises and wonders of its own.   

Recorded at the Pavilion Theatre, Sunday 9th October 2016

Listen back at:https://soundcloud.com/dlr-soundcloud/margaret-atwood